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New JVC 4K Prosumer Camera Updated Info:

Remember when JVC showed off that $200,000+ Model KY-F4000 4K resolution 3840 x 2160 Sensor 1.25″ CMOS camera. Yep put your hand down fibber because not many do.
Well JVC have been playing with 4K for a few years in projectors, TV’s, and Studio cameras with limited releases. All pretty much top end stuff till now it seems. We now have news that JVC will will use some that of 4K and 2K goodness and squish it into a Prosumer camcorder and show a camera off at CES Expo in Las Vegas, Nevada from January 6 to 9.
So we have RED EPIC and Scarlet cameras allegedly coming very soon and oh wasn’t the Scarlet first touted as the 3K for 3K Soccer Mum camera? Seems like JVC might just take that title of Soccer Mum camera over with a little hand held 4K 3D capable Handycam.

Main Features

* High-speed processing of camera signals and video/still image codecs, including Full HD 2D/3D, 4K2K and high-speed photographs. In addition to 2.7 times faster processing than previous CPU, the new CPU supports various signal-processing technologies (see below) that have been fully revised for superior high-resolution image recording;
* Signal processing
o Camera-signal processing is 1.7 times faster than JVC’s previous technology, enabling 8.3-megapixel video at 60 frames per second;
o H.264 video processing is double JVC’s previous technology, enabling compression of 2.07-megapixel images at 60 frames per second;
o JPEG still-image processing is 5.5 times faster than JVC’s previous technology, enabling compression at up to 8.3-megapixel images at 60 frames per second;
* In addition to its image-signal processor, advanced image codecs and other image-processing technologies assembled into one chip, the LSI incorporates leading-edge 40nm process technology for high functionality, 40% reduction of power consumption and 50% reduction of system costs compared to previous LSIs. The result is a high-level LSI suited to a wide range of both consumer and professional products;
* All hardware and software is integrated into one platform, enabling products that incorporate this platform to be commercialized highly rapidly.

Main Technologies
1. The LSI achieves real-time 3D compression of separate Full HD images (1920 x 1080/60p) from right and left cameras using MPEG-4 MVC. The amount of data is double the conventional side-by-side 3D recording format, enabling high-resolution Full HD 3D images with one chip.

2. 4K2K images (3840 x 2160/60p) using an ultra-resolution camera system are supported.

3. High-speed camera-processing circuitry and a high-speed JPEG engine enable the simultaneous capture of Full HD video and 8.3 megapixel stills at 60 frames per second.

4. High-speed frame video capture for 3D recording at 300 frames per second based on high-speed video codec.

History of JVC LSIs for Camcorders
JVC leveraged its years of experience with signal-processing technology to develop its first high-resolution image-processing engine, the HD Gigabrid, in spring 2007. The engine was incorporated in the Everio GZ-HD7 camcorder with internal hard disk drive, the world’s first Full HD 1920×1080i camcorder for consumers, which began selling in March 2007. Thereafter, JVC achieved higher resolutions for newer products, such as the HD Gigabrid Duo and HD Gigabrid Premium, both of which have received critical acclaim.

Here is what we know from Electronista:

JVC this week announced it will soon introduce the first LSI chip technology in its consumer camcorders. The 40nm chip will bring with it high-speed processing of HD video, the ability to shoot in HD in 3D, and high-resolution 4K images that are nearly four times higher than 1080p images. LSI technology is also less power hungry and expensive by hosting all these features on one chip.
The LSI chip will make processing 2.7 times faster than previous CPUs, JVC said, with camera-signal processing 1.7 times faster. This enables 8.3-megapixel video at 60 frames per second. H.264 video processing is twice as fast as well, allowing for 2.07-megapixel images at 60 frames per second.

Read more at electronista.

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